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TPM Implementation: The Key to Sustainable Manufacturing Excellence

by Allan Ung


Introduction


Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is a continuous improvement program designed to optimize the performance of production equipment by involving all employees in the maintenance process. The Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance (JIPM) and Seiichi Nakajima, a Japanese engineer and TPM pioneer, developed a 12-step TPM implementation model that has become widely used in manufacturing industries worldwide. In this blog, we will explore the 12 steps of TPM implementation as defined by the JIPM model, and the best practices for successful implementation.


12 Steps of TPM Implementation

The 12 Steps of TPM Implementation




Step 1: Establishing a Company-wide TPM Policy


The first step in TPM implementation is to establish a company-wide TPM policy. This involves defining and communicating the TPM policy and objectives to all employees, obtaining commitment and support from top management, and developing a plan to integrate TPM with the company's business strategy.


Best practices:


• Develop a clear and concise TPM policy that aligns with the company's overall objectives

• Involve all employees in the development of the TPM policy and obtain their buy-in

• Ensure top management is committed to TPM and actively participates in its implementation

• Develop a plan to integrate TPM with the company's business strategy



Step 2: Forming a TPM Committee


The second step in TPM implementation is to form a cross-functional TPM committee. The committee is responsible for planning, coordinating, and monitoring TPM activities. This step involves assigning responsibilities for TPM implementation to committee members and developing a communication plan to ensure TPM activities are understood and supported throughout the organization.


Best practices:


• Ensure the TPM committee has representatives from all areas of the organization

• Assign specific roles and responsibilities to committee members

• Develop a communication plan to ensure all employees are informed and involved in TPM activities

• Hold regular meetings to review progress and address any issues that arise



Step 3: Conducting a Preliminary Education and Training


The third step in TPM implementation is to provide education and training to employees to develop a common understanding of TPM concepts and terminology. This step involves developing a training plan for TPM implementation team members and other employees.


Best practices:


• Provide training to all employees, including management, to ensure everyone understands TPM concepts and terminology

• Develop a comprehensive training plan that includes both classroom and on-the-job training

• Use a variety of training methods, including workshops, e-learning, and job shadowing

• Ensure training is ongoing and includes regular refresher courses



Step 4: Setting a TPM Plan


The fourth step in TPM implementation is to develop a detailed plan for TPM implementation, including timelines and milestones. This step involves identifying key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure the effectiveness of TPM activities and obtaining agreement from stakeholders on the TPM plan.


Best practices:


• Develop a detailed TPM plan that includes specific timelines and milestones

• Identify KPIs that align with the company's overall objectives and use them to measure the effectiveness of TPM activities

• Obtain agreement from stakeholders, including employees, suppliers, and customers, on the TPM plan

• Regularly review and adjust the TPM plan as needed based on progress and results



Step 5: Launching Autonomous Maintenance Activities


The fifth step in TPM implementation is to empower operators to take responsibility for cleaning, inspection, and basic maintenance of equipment. This step involves training operators on equipment care and maintenance, establishing procedures for reporting and escalating equipment issues, and implementing visual management tools.


Best practices:


• Empower operators to take ownership of equipment maintenance and care

• Develop clear procedures for reporting and escalating equipment issues

• Use visual management tools, such as checklists and color-coded tags, to support autonomous maintenance

• Provide ongoing training and support to operators to ensure they have the skills and knowledge needed to perform maintenance activities



Step 6: Launching Planned Maintenance Activities


The sixth step in implementing TPM is to develop a planned maintenance program to supplement autonomous maintenance. This step involves establishing a maintenance schedule and procedures and implementing a spare parts management system.


Best practices:


• Develop a comprehensive maintenance schedule and procedures for carrying out maintenance activities

• Implement a spare parts management system to ensure that the necessary parts are available when needed

• Conduct regular inspections to identify potential issues before they become problems

• Use data analysis to identify the root cause of failures and implement corrective actions

• Provide regular training to maintenance personnel to improve their skills and knowledge



Step 7: Introducing Quality Maintenance Activities


Developing a quality maintenance program to improve equipment performance and reduce defects is the next step in TPM implementation. In this step, quality standards for equipment performance are established, and measures are implemented to prevent defects from occurring and detect them early if they do occur.


Best Practices:


• Involve the operators in the development of the quality standards for equipment performance

• Conduct regular audits to ensure that the standards are being met

• Train the employees on the principles of Total Quality Management (TQM) to help them understand the importance of quality in the overall success of the organization



Step 8: Introducing Focused Improvement Activities


The focused improvement step aims to identify and eliminate equipment-related losses. The goal is to improve overall equipment efficiency and effectiveness by reducing unplanned downtime, reducing defects, and increasing productivity.


Best Practices:


• Establish a cross-functional team with representatives from different departments to identify and prioritize improvement projects

• Provide training to team members on problem-solving techniques and establish a system for tracking improvement projects and results



Step 9: Introducing Education and Training Activities


The education and training step focuses on enhancing employee skills and knowledge related to TPM. This step involves providing education and training on topics such as equipment maintenance, quality improvement, and problem-solving techniques.


Best Practices:


• Develop a comprehensive training program that addresses the specific needs of each department

• The training should be interactive and hands-on to maximize retention and application of the knowledge gained

• Use on-the-job training and cross-functional teams to reinforce learning



Step 10: Establishing TPM Administration Systems


Establishing systems and procedures for TPM data collection, analysis, and reporting is critical for the sustained success of TPM. This step involves developing a system for maintaining and analyzing equipment history, establishing procedures for equipment modification and replacement, and developing a system for TPM data collection, analysis, and reporting.


Best Practices:


• Involve all relevant stakeholders in the development of the systems and procedures

• Ensure that the systems are user-friendly and easy to use

• Conduct regular audits to ensure that the systems are being used correctly and that the data collected is accurate



Step 11: Developing Safety, Health, and Environmental Activities


Integrating safety, health, and environmental considerations into TPM activities is crucial for ensuring that the equipment is operated and maintained safely and responsibly. This step involves developing procedures for safe equipment operation and maintenance, implementing measures to minimize environmental impacts, and promoting employee health and safety.


Best Practices:


• Involve all employees in the development of the procedures and measures

• Review and update the procedures and measures regularly to ensure that they remain effective and relevant



Step 12: Implementing TPM Activity Indicators and Evaluating Their Effectiveness


The final step in implementing TPM is to measure the effectiveness of TPM activities and make improvements where necessary. Key performance indicators (KPIs) are used to measure the effectiveness of TPM activities and to identify areas for improvement.


Best practices:


• Develop a set of KPIs that align with the company's business goals and objectives

• Establish a system for collecting and analyzing data on KPIs

• Regularly review and evaluate the effectiveness of TPM activities and making adjustments to the TPM plan as needed

• Use data analysis to identify trends and patterns that can help to improve equipment performance and reduce downtime

• Communicate the results of TPM activities and KPIs to all stakeholders to ensure that everyone is aware of the progress being made



Conclusion


In conclusion, Total Productive Maintenance (TPM) is an effective approach for organizations to improve the productivity, reliability, and safety of their equipment. The 12 steps of TPM implementation based on the Japan Institute of Plant Maintenance (JIPM) model provide a structured approach to implementing TPM and ensuring its success.


Each step of TPM implementation involves key activities and best practices that organizations can follow to effectively implement TPM. From establishing a company-wide TPM policy to evaluating the effectiveness of TPM activities, following the 12 steps can help organizations achieve their TPM goals.


Overall, TPM is not just a maintenance philosophy, but also a way of life for organizations that aim to continually improve their processes and equipment. By implementing TPM, organizations can reduce downtime, increase productivity, and improve safety, leading to higher profitability and competitive advantage.




Allan Ung

Article by Allan Ung, JIPM-certified TPM Instructor. He is also the Principal Consultant at Operational Excellence Consulting, a Singapore-based management consultancy firm that assists organizations in maximizing customer value and minimizing wastes through adoption of Design Thinking and Lean Thinking practices. For more information, please visit www.oeconsulting.com.sg


 

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